CEA IBD

Project Overview

Crohn’s & Colitis Australia (CCA) is undertaking a major 4–year research project in collaboration with Swinburne University of Technology Centre for Global Health and Equity to improve the information and services that are provided to people with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Four major project activities will be implemented and evaluated within the CEA-IBD project over the next year to make it easier for people living with IBD and their carers to access, understand and use health information and services. The four activities are:

  • CCA website redesign and up to date information published on a range of IBD topics,
  • to create culturally specific IBD resources,
  • to create rural/regional specific information resources, and
  • to create resources to provide to clinicians that link patients to CCA website.

CCA has prioritised these activities based on 70 ideas that were generated in interviews and workshops with almost 40 people with IBD and carers and almost 40 healthcare professionals. CCA is excited to progress this project into the next phase and produce high quality, evidence based information that is easily accessible to consumers. The materials and interventions are expected to be a range of online, interactive and print materials.

The first stage of this project was to undertake an important survey of the health literacy of people living with IBD or caring for someone who has IBD. We are very grateful to more than 800 people with IBD and carers who provided information that will help CCA make it easier for people living with IBD and their carers to access, understand and use health information and services.

You can view our publication about Optimising Health Literacy and Access (Ophelia) process for IBD in BMJ Open Journal here:

The CEA-IBD project and findings were presented at the Global Health Literacy Summit in October 2021. You can watch the presentation below.

Updates on the project will be available on this page in the future.

This project has been approved by the Swinburne University of Technology Human Research Ethics Committee (Ref:20202968) and is funded by the Australian Government Department of Health.